Mortgage Rates
Refinance Rates
FHA Rates
VA Rates
Jumbo Rates
Adjustable Rate Mortgage Rates
Interest Only Mortgage Rates
Non-Owner Occupied Rates
Home Equity Loan Rates
Click to Close
Mortgage Rates
Refinance Rates
FHA Rates
VA Rates
Jumbo Rates
Adjustable Rate Mortgage Rates
Interest Only Mortgage Rates
Non-Owner Occupied Rates
Home Equity Loan Rates
Navigate Section
How an Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) Works

How an Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) Works

  • Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) Overview
  • Adjustable Rate Mortgages (ARMs) typically have a fixed interest rate for a set period of time, called the fixed rate or "teaser" period, which is usually the first 3, 5, 7 or 10 years of the mortgage, and then convert into an annual or semi-annual (adjusts every six months) adjustable mortgage for the remainder of the mortgage term, which is called the adjustable rate period.  During the adjustable rate period the interest rate and monthly mortgage payment for an ARM can change and potentially increase significantly.  These mortgages are called 3/1, 5/1, 7/1 and 10/1 ARMs.  ARMs typically have 30 year terms.  In the case of a 3/1 ARM, the interest rate is fixed for the first three years of the mortgage and then is subject to adjust annually for the remaining 27 years of the mortgage.

  • CalculatorUse our ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGE CALCULATOR to calculator the monthly payment and worst case scenario for an ARM
  • The most important thing to understand about an ARM is that the interest rate can change over the life of the mortgage.  With an ARM, the borrower faces the risk of having to pay a higher monthly mortgage payment in the event that interest rates increase over the course of the mortgage.  Conversely, if interest rates decrease, then the borrower could potentially pay a lower monthly payment.

  • FREEandCLEAR Mortgage Instructional Video

    Watch our "Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) Overview" instructional video

  • Teaser Rate for an Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM)

    Interest rate pricing for the initial fixed rate period is set by the lender and is typically lower than the interest rate for a 30 year fixed rate mortgage.  The initial interest rate for an ARM is often referred to as the "teaser rate" because the lower rate and monthly mortgage payment entices borrowers.  This is the primary reason to choose an ARM -- because the interest rate and mortgage payment are lower than a fixed rate mortgage during the initial period of the loan.  Another reason to select an ARM is if you think interest rates are going to decline significantly in the future although ARMs also carry the risk that your mortgage payment will increase if interest rates rise in the future.

    Fully-Indexed Rate for an Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM)

    The interest rate for the adjustable rate period, which follows the fixed rate period, is called the fully-indexed rate.  The fully-indexed rate is calculated by adding the ARM index to the ARM margin.  The index is an underlying rate that can change. Lenders typically use the 1 year LIBOR as the ARM index but be sure to confirm what index your lender uses.  Simply put, LIBOR represents the interest rate that banks charge each other to borrow money and changes with fluctuations in the economy.  The ARM margin is a set interest rate amount that does not change over the term of the loan.  The ARM margin is typically 2.0% - 3.0%.  So if the 1 year LIBOR is 1.000% and the ARM margin is 2.250% then the fully-indexed rate is 3.250%.

    The fully-indexed rate is re-calculated on an annual basis for the remainder of the mortgage term following the fixed rate period and will change with any fluctuations in the ARM index.  So in the case of a 3/1 ARM, the fully-indexed rate adjusts on an annual basis for the final 27 years of the mortgage.  The fully-indexed rate is calculated on the first day of the month prior to the adjustment date for the mortgage.  So if the fully-indexed rate is scheduled to adjust on October 1st, then the rate is calculated on September 1st.

    Adjustment Caps for an Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM)

    ARMs have an initial adjustment cap that limits the change in the interest rate at the time of the first adjustment period.  The initial adjustment cap is typically 2.0% or 5.0%.  ARMs have a subsequent adjustment cap that limits the change in interest rate in any adjustment period following the initial adjustment.  ARMs also have a life cap which limits the maximum increase in interest rate over the term of the mortgage.  The typical life cap for an ARM is 5.0% which means the fully indexed rate cannot exceed the initial fixed period interest rate by more than 5.0%.

    Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) Key Items

    The table below summarizes the key items to focus on in evaluating an adjustable rate mortgage (ARM).

Key Adjustable Rate Mortgage Concepts
Term
  • Indicates the length of the mortgage, presented in years
  • ARMs typically have a term of 30 years
  • A 30 year ARM has 360 monthly mortgage payments (12 payments per year * 30 years = 360 total monthly payments)
  • Monthly mortgage payments may change over the term of the mortgage
Fixed Rate Period
  • Initial time period for ARM during which the interest rate is fixed and cannot change
  • The fixed rate period is typically 3, 5, 7 or 10 years
Fixed Period Interest Rate
  • The interest rate for the initial fixed rate period
Adjustable Rate Period
  • The period of time from the end of the fixed rate period through the end of the term of the mortgage during which the interest rate is subject to change on a pre-determined basis, either annually or semi-annually
Adjustment Interval
  • Indicates how often the interest rate for an ARM adjusts during the adjustable rate period
  • The adjustment interval for most ARMs is a year although some ARMs have semi-annual (six month) intervals
Fully-Indexed Rate
  • ARM interest rate for the adjustable rate period
  • Calculated by adding the ARM index to the ARM margin
  • The fully-indexed rate typically adjusts every year during the adjustable rate period and will change with fluctuations in interest rates
Index
  • The index is an underlying interest rate that is one of two components of the fully-indexed rate
  • The value of the index can change over the term of the mortgage
  • Lenders typically use the 1 year LIBOR as the ARM index
Margin
  • The second of two components used to calculate the fully-indexed rate
  • The margin is a set interest rate amount that does not change over the term of the loan
  • The ARM margin is typically 2.0% - 3.0%
Initial Adjustment Cap
  • A cap that limits the change in interest rate when it first adjusts following the fixed rate period
  • The initial adjustment cap is typically 2.0% or 5.0%
  • For example, if the initial adjustment cap is 5.0%, the initial fully indexed rate following the fixed rate period cannot go up by more than 5.0% as compared to the fixed period interest rate
Subsequent Adjustment Cap
  • A cap that limits the change in the fully-indexed rate in any adjustment period following the initial adjustment
Life Cap
  • A cap that limits the maximum increase in interest rate over the term of the mortgage
  • The typical life cap for an ARM is 5.0% which means the fully indexed rate cannot exceed the initial fixed period interest rate plus 5.0%

    Where You Can Find Information About Your Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM)

    Lenders are required to provide a Loan Estimate that outlines key mortgage features, including ARM terms, within three business days of a borrower submitting a loan application.  The Loan Estimate for an ARM will indicate if, when and by how much the interest rate and monthly payment can change (page 1).  The bottom of page 2 of the LE has an Adjustable Payment (AP) table that indicates a range of estimated mortgage payments at the first adjustment period, how often the payment can change after the first adjustment (adjustment interval) and the maximum possible payment amount and when the maximum payment can occur.  The bottom of page 2 of the Loan Estimate also has an Adjustable Interest Rate (AIR) table that indicates the initial interest rate, the index and margin, the minimum and maximum interest rate, when the rate can initially adjust and how frequently it can adjust thereafter (adjustment interval); and, the limit on the change/increase in interest rate at the first adjustment period (initial cap) and subsequent adjustment periods (life cap).  Additionally, all of the key terms of the ARM including initial interest rate, index and margin are set forth in the mortgage note and the ARM addendum attached to the mortgage note.

  • Why Select an Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM)
  • With so many moving parts and so much complexity, you may ask why would someone would select an adjustable rate mortgage (ARM) for their mortgage? The answer is because the initial "teaser" interest rate and monthly mortgage payment for an ARM during the fixed rate period are typically lower than the interest rate and monthly payment for a fixed rate mortgage.  The lower initial rate and monthly payment may also enable you to qualify for a larger mortgage amount.

    So if you know that you are only going to own the property during the fixed rate period then an ARM may be the right mortgage program for you.  That way you benefit from the lower monthly mortgage payment during the fixed rate period but you are not exposed to a potential increase in interest rate and monthly payment during the adjustable rate period of the loan.

    The other reason to select an ARM is if you think that interest rates are going to decline significantly in the future.  If interest rates decline during the adjustable rate period of your ARM then your monthly mortgage payment will decline as well.  Applying the same rationale, although it is somewhat counter intuitive, ARMs can be a good option for borrowers in a high interest rate environment if you think rates will eventually decline over time.  Predicting interest rates can be very challenging, especially over the 30 year term of a typical ARM, so this strategy exposes the borrower to meaningful risk.

  • Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) Rates
  • The interest rate you pay on an ARM depends on several factors including your credit score, loan-to-value (LTV) ratio, fixed rate period length and mortgage type.  Additionally, adjustable rate mortgage rates tend to be lower than the interest rate for a fixed rate mortgage or interest only mortgage. Adjustable rate mortgages are provided by traditional lenders such as banks, mortgage banks, mortgage brokers and credit unions.  Borrowers should shop multiple lenders to find the ARM with the lowest interest rate and fees. Click on lenders in the table below or INTEREST RATES to compare adjustable rate mortgage interest rates.

    • NMLS
    Great! We sent your message to the lender!

    By clicking the "Request More Info" button you: (a) agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, and (b) consent to be contacted by this lender using the contact information provided by you through various means, such as an automated dialing system or pre-recorded voice messages, even if you are otherwise listed on a do not call or email registry or are charged for the call. Your consent is not required to receive services from this lender.

    Rate Details*
    Loan Program:  
    Monthly Payment:  
    APR:  
    Rate:  
    Points  More Info:
    Points: Fees you are willing to pay in order to get a lower interest rate. The number of points refers to the percentage of the loan amount that you would pay. For example, "2 points" means a charge of 2% of the loan amount.
     
    Total Lender Fees:  
    Loan type:  
    Property Value:  
    Loan to Value:  
    Credit Rating:  
    Date Submitted:  
    Monthly Housing Payments
    P & I More Info
    Principal & Interest: A periodic payment, usually paid monthly, that includes the interest charges for the period plus an amount applied to the reduction of the principal balance.
    Mortgage Insurance More Info
    Mortgage Insurance: The monthly cost for a policy that protects the lender in case you’re unable to repay the full amount of the loan. It is typically required for loans that have a loan-to-value ratio between 80% to 100%.
    (Estimated)
    Property Tax More Info
    Property Tax: (Also called "Real Estate Tax.") Property taxes are government assessments on real estate property. With mortgage financing, the local, county or state tax assessment on real estate property is considered part of the monthly housing obligation and typically collected and set aside by the lender ...
    (Estimated)
    Homeowner Insurance More Info
    Homeowner Insurance: or also commonly called hazard insurance, is the type of property insurance that covers private homes. It is an insurance policy that combines various personal insurance protections, which can include losses occurring to one’s home, its contents, loss of its use, or loss of other personal possessions of the homeowner, as well as liability insurance for accidents that may happen at the home or at the hands of the homeowner within the policy territory.lender ...
    (Estimated)
    Homeowner Association Fee More Info
    Homeowner Association fee: (HOA) fees are funds that are collected from homeowners in a condominium complex to obtain the income needed to pay (typically) for master insurance, exterior and interior (as appropriate) maintenance, landscaping, water, sewer, and garbage costs.
    (If Any)
    Total Monthly Housing Payments
    Lender Fees
    Points More Info
    Points Fees you are willing to pay in order to get a lower interest rate. The number of points refers to the percentage of the loan amount that you would pay. For example, "2 points" means a charge of 2% of the loan amount.
    Origination Fee More Info
    Origination Charge: A loan origination charge is a fee charged by the lender for evaluating, processing, and closing the loan.
    Credit Report Fee More Info
    Credit Report Fee: Fee charged to obtain an applicant’s credit history prepared by one or all of the three major credit bureaus. Used by lender to determine the borrower’s creditworthiness.
    Tax Service Fee More Info
    Tax Service Fee: A fee charged by the lender to cover the cost of retaining a tax service agency. These agencies monitor the property tax payments on the property and report the results to the lender.
    Processing Fee More Info
    Processing Fee: A processing fee is a charge by the lender for clerical items associated with the loan. Examples of processing include loan set up, organization of loan conditions for underwriting, and preparing required disclosures for the borrower.
    Underwriting Fee More Info
    Underwriting Fee: A fee charged by the lender to verify information on the loan application, authenticate the property’s value, and perform a risk analysis on the overall loan package.
    Wire Transfer Fee More Info
    Wire Transfer Fee: In most cases lenders wire funds to escrow companies to fund a loan. Commercial banks that perform this function will charge the lender so the fee is generally passed on to the borrower.
    (If Any)
    FHA Upfront Premium More Info
    FHA Upfront Premium: A fee paid in cash at the close of escrow or more commonly it is financed into the loan. These premiums are pooled together by the FHA and are used to insure the risk of borrower default on FHA loans. FHA upfront premiums are prorated over a five year period, meaning should the homeowner refinance or sell during the first five years of the loan, they are entitled to a partial refund of the FHA upfront premium paid at loan inception.
    (If any)
    VA funding Fee (If any)
    Flood Fee
    Other Fees More Info

    Other fees could be either additional Administrative Fees that a lender charges or it could be a Flat Fee to cover all lender charges such as: (Origination Fees, Points, Underwriting and Processing Fees, Credit Reports and Tax Service Fees)

    The flat fee does not include prepaid items and third party costs such as appraisal fees, recording fees, prepaid interest, property & transfer taxes, homeowners insurance, borrower’s attorney’s fees, private mortgage insurance premiums (if applicable), survey costs, title insurance and related services.

    Total Lender Fees
    *Actual rates and other information may vary. Sponsored results shown only include participating lenders. The information you enter on this page will only be shared with lenders you choose to contact, either by calling the phone number or requesting a quote.
    Compare Adjustable Rate Mortgage Mortgage Rates
    • Lender
    • APR
    • Loan Type
    • Rate
    • Payment
    • Fees
    • Contact
    Data provided by Informa Research Services. Payments do not include amounts for taxes and insurance premiums. The actual payment obligation will be greater if taxes and insurance are included. Click here for more information on rates and product details.
  • Example: Comparing Monthly Mortgage Payments for an ARM to a Fixed Rate Mortgage
  • The chart below compares the monthly mortgage payments for a $380,000 mortgage for 3/1, 5/1, 7/1 and 10/1 ARMs with a 30 year fixed rate mortgage.  Please note that for the ARMs, the chart shows the interest rate and monthly mortgage payment for the initial fixed rate period.  Both the interest rate and mortgage payment are subject to change following the fixed rate period.   As the chart illustrates, an ARM typically allows borrowers to save money on their monthly mortgage payment during the initial fixed rate period in comparison to a fixed rate mortgage.

Monthly Payment for a $380,000 Mortgage

Monthly Mortgage Payment $1,925 $1,850 $1,775 $1,625 $1,550 $1,475 $1,400
  • $1,501
    3/1 ARM
  • $1,526
    5/1 ARM
  • $1,551
    7/1 ARM
  • $1,628
    10 / 1 ARM
  • $1,760
    30 Year Fixed Rate
Mortgage Program
  • Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) Teaser or Fixed Rate Period
  • The length of the fixed rate, or teaser, period for an adjustable rate mortgage (ARM) directly affects the interest rate during the fixed rate period.  The shorter the fixed rate period, the lower the interest rate and the lower the monthly mortgage payment.  The trade-off of a shorter fixed rate period and lower interest rate is that the adjustable rate period is longer, which exposes the borrower to more risk that the ARM interest rate will increase and remain higher for a longer period of time.

    The chart below demonstrates how the length of the fixed rate period impacts the initial "teaser" interest rate for an ARM.  As illustrated by the chart, the shorter the fixed rate period, the lower the interest rate.

Interest Rate

Interest Rate 4.800% 4.000% 3.200% 2.400% 1.600% 0.800% 0.000%
  • 2.500%
    3/1 ARM
  • 2.625%
    5/1 ARM
  • 2.750%
    7/1 ARM
  • 3.125%
    10 / 1 ARM
  • 3.750%
    30 Year Fixed Rate
Mortgage Program
  • How Amortization Works for an Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM)
  • Both fixed rate mortgages and ARMs amortize, which means the monthly payment is comprised of both principal and interest payments and that the loan is re-paid in full with the final payment.  The difference in amortization between a fixed rate mortgage and an ARM is that the ARM loan balance re-amortizes over the remaining term of the mortgage every time the interest rate adjusts.  Because an ARM’s interest rate changes on an annual or semi-annual basis during the adjustable rate period, the loan balance must be re-amortized, using the fully-indexed rate, every year over the remaining term of the loan.

    For example, a 3/1 ARM first adjusts at the end of year three.  The monthly mortgage payment beginning in year four is based on the loan balance, fully-indexed rate and an amortization period of 27 years, the remaining term of the mortgage.  At the end of year four, the mortgage payment is based on an amortization period of 26 years, and so on.

    The re-amortization of an ARM is in contrast to a fixed rate mortgage which has a set amortization period over the life of the loan.  For example, the amortization period for a 30 year fixed rate mortgage is set at 30 years.  What does this difference in amortization mean for the borrower?

    It means that a borrower with an ARM may have a higher monthly mortgage payment than a borrower with a fixed rate mortgage because the remaining mortgage balance is amortized over a shorter period of time.  Every time an ARM adjusts, a potential increase in interest rate and the re-amortization of the mortgage balance over a shorter period of time can both contribute to an increase in monthly mortgage payment which is an added risk for the borrower.

  • Great Mortgage IdeaRelated FREEandCLEAR Resources
X

Get Free Personalized Mortgage Quotes

First Name:
Last Name:
Phone Number:
Email:

My Mortgage Info

Mortgage Type
Credit Score
Loan Amount
Property Value
City
State
GET FREE Quotes
FREEandCLEAR.comThank you for submitting your information!
FREEandCLEAR.comYour mortgage quote request has been sent to our lending partners and you should receive emails from multiple lenders shortly
FREEandCLEAR.comComparing proposals from multiple lenders is the best way to save money on your mortgage!